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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
cool, techie-type gadgets we saw. >> he started his own company to turn science fiction into reality. >> ah! >> science nonfiction. >> starting 10, 12, 16 foot back from the screen, we can be accurate when pointing. >> john actually created technology you can in a manipulate with the use of your hands. you see in this video, gloves with sensors on fingers and backs of the palms of the hand. watch what he can do. >> moving left, moving left to right. up and down and in and out, control. >> it looks like the skyline of downtown los angeles, and he is maneuvering just using his hands and his fingers. it's just like what we see in movies like "iron man." robert downey jr. standing there, manipulating, bringing things together just with the move of his digits. >> i need the sound going -- >> gross level remote control here just with the hands. backwards. >> utilizes this technology to go through and play videos. >> how cool is it, for our show. >>> clumsy cat. [ laughter ] >> saying that sex sells. apparently that is also the case in the real estate industry in queensland, australia. here
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
for inviting me. >> hong kong university of science and technology. very much appreciate your thoughts. let's give you a look at what's on the agenda in asia tomorrow. japan central bank begins its two-day policy meeting. the boj is likely to stand pat this time around but may signal more stimulus on the 30th of october. elsewhere, india posed september services pmi following strong numbers in august and cnbc will have an exclusive interview with malaysia's prime minister, so be sure to tune in for that. >>> back over this side of the world, business activity in the eurozone shows no sign of a rebound. the latest composite pmi figures for september fell to the low nest three years. france and spain saw a mild contraction as the country struggled with painful austerity measures. >>> meanwhile, growth in britain's sector services slowed in september. services pmi fell to 52.2 last month down from a reading of 53.7 in august. joining us now discuss is chris williamson, chief economist at market. good to have you onboard. i want to start out with the uk numbers because we've seen some move in t
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we've heard it all morning long it and still makes us jump. a huge 747 crashing in the dessert, by remote control, all part of the discover channel's new "curiosity" series where a controlled experiment was captured by 40 cameras and sensors to give researchers what happens during a crash atlantaing. >> it airs on discovery channel this sunday night at 9 p.m. two top experts are here with us now, accident investigator dr. tom barth and dr. cindy bir. >> thank you for being with us this morning. we're very excited about this. >> i asked you, dr. bir, earlier, have you ever attempted to do this before and you said you have. this took over four years to plan. why did you want to crash a plane? >> we were -- i was approached by a production company to do this about four years ago. i think tom and i were approached about the same sometime. and was just such an interesting project. i didn't attempt it before, but it was attempted back in '84. and they had lessons learned. we have new technology. so, it was a wonderful opp
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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